Goal Setting- What do you REALLY want?

We all set goals. Some of us want to lose weight.  Some of us want to save money. Some of us want to start a new career.  Whatever your goal, the way you set it may be the key to achieving the desired outcome.

Problem #1: Only seeing the BIG picture

“Leigh Ann, I want to lose 50 pounds”

To my weight-loss focused clients, I often ask “What do you want to get from the PROCESS of losing weight?” and they look at me like “DUH, I want to get skinny.” Beyond fitting into an old pair of jeans, I like to have my clients list out some intentions for their weight loss process. Since a 50 pound weight loss could take up to a year, even with consistent work, it’s more motivating to set smaller, action-oriented goals along the way so we, as a team, aren’t just staring at the scale every week. Here are some examples:

On my way to a 50 lb. weight loss, I will:

  • Log my food honestly each day
  • Take at least 3 fitness classes each week
  • Eat more fruits and vegetables
  • Run my first 5k

Little accomplishments along the way lead to long-term motivation and a realization that ‘I want to lose 50 pounds’ also means ‘I want to become a healthier, more active person’.

Problem #2: All or nothing mentality

Often, clients come to me expecting that I’ll put them on a regimented diet and punish them if they eat an Oreo. That’s not my style.  In fact, a 2002 study by Stewart entitled “Rigid versus Flexible Dieting” showed that rigid dieting strategies are associated with symptoms of eating disorders and higher BMI in non-obese women.

Given the studies and my own experience, I’ve found that long term success comes from a MODERATE, CONSISTENT approach.  I’ve said it before, and I’ll say it until I retire – for every period of deprivation, there is an equal and opposite binge.  This is why I don’t advocate “dieting” – dieting, in the fad diet/magic shakes/pills/etc method is not maintainable for the long term and EVERY person I’ve ever known on one of these diets gained back all the weight and then some. Trust me, I was a fat kid.  Been there, done that.

I recommend that my weight-loss focused clients work within a calorie budget, but eat how they want to eat.  If they want pizza, they can have it – they just have to ‘budget’ their calories appropriately. Find something that works for you, and STICK TO IT.

Problem #3: Inflexible thinking

In the words of my father, there is more than one way to skin a cat. (Did I mention I’m from Shelby?) A common misconception among my clients is that running is the only way to lose weight. This is, interestingly, especially true of my clients who HATE RUNNING.

Much like dieting, if you want to stick to it, exercise should be something you enjoy. Huberty et. al. (2008) showed that enjoying exercise, and realizing how exercise improves quality of life, is a major motivating factor for exercise adherence. It doesn’t matter if it’s circuit training, indoor cycling, or joining a Zumba class – find something you like, and stick to it! Exercise doesn’t have to be torture to be productive.  If your goal is weight loss, all you need to do is burn calories.

It sounds to easy, doesn’t it?  Set little goals on your way to the big goal.  Eat what you like, but stay in a calorie budget.  Do exercise that you love and stick to it.  The approach is not as fancy as your Rachael Ray Show ‘diet of the month’.  I don’t make promises about losing 10 pounds in a week, Prevention Magazine style.  What I give you is science-based, moderate, and maintainable over a lifetime. Expect missteps. Expect set-backs. More importantly, with consistency, expect results that work with your body, not against it.

Leigh Ann Yeager, MS
INDY WEEKLY “Personal Trainer of the Year” 2012, 2014
Director of SYNCWELLNESS, Programming

Cycling – Yoga – Wellness
[p] (919) 572-7962
[e] la@syncstudio.net

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From Fit to Corporate and Back: Cathy’s Story

My road to personal training started early.  I have always been involved in sports- from elementary school through college.  I always thought I would coach basketball or something.  I really enjoyed teaching others about sports and showing how much fun one could have doing physical activities.  I played team sports through high school and ran club track at UNC.  While taking one of the mandatory undergrad PE classes, I helped my instructor teach our volleyball class.


I graduated with degrees in Exercise & Sports Science and Psychology, but I needed a JOB asap.  I took a position with a local bank.  I had been a seasonal teller during college back home, so I had relevant experience.  All of a sudden I found myself in the “corporate world” working hard during the week without any routine for exercise.  I wasn’t making the time for it.  I would go for a run after work sometimes, but that was it.  I was definitely more concerned with what song I could run to rather that the quality physical activity I was getting (I was not getting it.)  How could I forget so quickly everything I learned in college?


Fast forward 4 years and I had HAD it (officially) with a seemingly unfulfilling 9-5 job in banking.  I quit and went back to school as a refresher before getting certified as a personal trainer.


As a single gal, living alone, I thought to myself that I needed to be STRONG.  I thought back to the times when my dad made me and my siblings carry him to safety while he pretended to be unconscious.  (That’s not weird, right?)  I thought about my new Vespa and how I need to be able to lift that thing off of me (nearly 500lbs) in the event of an emergency.  That is when I realized that running wasn’t going to cut it and I needed to lift weights.  I also needed to make time for this in my life, and make it a priority to reach my strength goals.


I chose a PT cert program that would give me hands-on training experience, and a thorough refresher of everything I studied in college.  This program also allowed me to set and reach a number of physical goals for myself- including doing 11 unassisted pull-ups in a row, woop woop!


I started taking on PT clients and leading small-group sessions in early 2009.  I started working as a trainer at SYNCSTUDIO in the summer of 2010.  I love having fun while torturing working out my clients.  I love seeing them meet their goals, and make gains in their physical capabilities. And I LOVE it when it becomes a habit and part of their healthy lifestyle.

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Baby Steps to Giant Leaps: Candace’s Journey to “Fitness”

My story starts out like so many others.  I’ve never been a skinny girl.  Well, there are plenty pictures of me in cute bikinis through, say, age 6, but after that, I generally looked like a little sausage encased in my spandex dance recital outfits.  It wasn’t until middle school that I began to sense that my heftier frame was the reason I didn’t fit in; by high school this sense had turned into a painful awareness of my jiggly thunder thighs every time I tried to wear cute shorts from Abercrombie & Fitch like my daintier peers.  Although my parents encouraged me to play sports (which, I did, if you define ‘playing’ by riding the bench), I’m not sure they really knew how to instill to me the fitness-related values of a healthy lifestyle.  I spent the majority of those years eating as I pleased without consistent exercise and was thus a thick girl who didn’t seem to fit in… although, maybe that’s how we all tend to feel at that age, regardless of how we look.

And so, at some point, I arrived at the thought that getting to the gym was my best bet to try to ‘fix’ my issue.  I began to work out at the local Y around age 16, and though my visits were consistent and full of hard work and sweat, I was more or less blind; working out with no goal in mind and certainly not altering my diet.  Nothing really changed, but I felt better.  Although I didn’t want to admit it or make the change, the missing piece at this point in my life was control over what I ate.  I had a vague idea of what ‘healthy’ was, but certainly didn’t practice it with any consistency, and was a mindless snacker.  Not to mention the near quarter-cup of sugar I added to my new habit of coffee in the mornings (I was a grown up!).

Although I generally continued to ‘work out’ throughout college and after, my constant struggle was always with food.  I did hire a personal trainer my senior year of college who turned me into the lean machine I always knew I could be; but the weight quickly returned when I graduated from school.  All of a sudden I found myself with no money to pay for a trainer, sitting behind a desk all day instead of being on my feet waiting tables, and partaking in whatever yummy snacks happened to be in the office kitchen.  Blech.

Even though most of these years didn’t really ‘get’ me anywhere in terms of looking different (Which, let’s be honest, isn’t that why most of us start a fitness journey? By not liking how we look?), I feel that the redundant circle of eating unhealthily and working out was an important one, especially in reflection.  It showed me that the limiting factor in any plan is almost always diet, and that, for me, diet was always going to be the hard part.  Putting in hard work at the gym was relatively easy and the resulting endorphins gave me reason to be consistent with it; it was the other part which eluded me.  I think many people struggle with either one or the other; and it’s finding balance that is key.

I finally was able to at least approach this balance when, post-marriage, I was suddenly staring at a number that was upwards of 170 on the scale.  SAY WHAT?!  For me, weight was always ‘just a number,’ as my generally muscular frame always kept me around 150-155 even though you may have guessed me to be lighter than that.  Even at a weight of 135 where I was working my tail off, I was just considered ‘healthy’ by BMI standards.  But, seeing that number really hit a nerve.  I know a lot of women tend to gain weight after getting married, and this was just another case, but I made the decision to NOT be okay with it.  I wanted to be healthy, I wanted to feel beautiful, I wanted something different for my life.  I needed a drastic change.

I threw caution to the wind, signed up for a half-marathon, and started running.  Running isn’t for everyone, and it was AWFUL to start; I could barely run a quarter mile.  There was a lot of walking, a lot of soreness, and a LOT of chafing – but once I crossed that finish line, I was CONVINCED this was my key to success.  I bought a scale and began tracking my weight.  I learned about food and calories.  I began logging what I ate and holding myself accountable for the decisions I made when it came to food.  I got back to the gym to start strength training (read: LIFTING per Leigh Ann Yeager).  By 2012, I’d lost the 20 pounds I put on in 2009 (plus 5-10 more), ran a 2 hour half marathon, and completed a full marathon in October.  Some CRAZY achievements given my starting point.

I’ve managed to keep all of that weight off by making sure I weigh myself 2-3 times a week, and making adjustments where it’s needed.  I always expect to gain 5-8lbs over the holidays, but instead of grimacing at the scale when I see that elevated number in January, I suck it up, eat less (and better), and work out more.  The formula for that is simple, and if you have the commitment and know that you’ll be happier once you make the changes, it’s 100% worth it.

So far, I’ve relayed my struggles with weight loss, food, and the scale.  Even though this was where my journey started, today it is such a small part of what fitness means to me.  While there is a LOT to be said for finding a happy weight and being able to embrace and sustain it, living well has brought more meaning to my life than I could have ever asked for.  For example, a funny thing happened when I ran that first half-marathon in 2010: random friends started running and training, telling me I was their inspiration – I became the reason: “well, if she can do it, I can.”  You can’t imagine how uplifting it is when your actions cause other people to make positive changes in their life – I had at least four friends complete half-marathons over the next couple of years who started training because of me.  It was during that time that I thought maybe, just maybe, there was something more to fitness for me than personal growth.

It was around 2012 that I began frequenting a local fitness spot called SYNCSTUDIO.  I fell in love with the energy, the people, the support, the laughs, and the community-mindedness.  As I grew to know many of the other members, it took me no time to realize that I wanted to make SYNCSTUDIO my new home.  If you’ve ever been through the circles of hell trying to get your fitness on track, you know it’s SUPER important to surround yourself with like-minded, kick-a** people on whom you can lean.  SYNCSTUDIO and their crazy style of cycling was so invigorating and fun, I took the leap to join their TYRO program and become a SYNCCYCLING instructor.  Not long after, I was encouraged to obtain my AFAA personal training certification, to begin to teach SYNCWELLNESS classes, and eventually become a personal trainer (the next leap I plan to take).

Nowadays, fitness is a main focus in my life not only for myself, but for others.  I believe that my journey to this point makes me someone who can help others find inner strength through health and wellness – and this, in turn, keeps me on track.  I want to show friends and clients that, whether a novice or an expert, there is always going to be something else that can challenge you and push you to new limits – and it’s at that place where the definition of ‘you’ changes, evolves, and becomes stronger.  Fitness enables you to learn your strengths and weaknesses and have fun doing it – those are some kind of powerful weapons to have when going through the craziness of life.  One of my favorite quotes is ‘Life begins at the end of your comfort zone’: I want to always remember this in my journey, and know that if I embody it, others will follow.

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Finding My Pants (size) and Myself: Lauren’s Fitness Journey

I feel like y’all know my journey because for the past four years, the SYNC community has been right there with me. On the bike enduring my singing; doing walkouts in TRX, or being badasses in goddess or warrior two on the mat. But before I get into the real turning point for me, here’s a little back story.

In high school, I was in modern dance and theater. It wasn’t uncommon to be in dance class for 2 hours a day at an arts school. My parents didn’t really do fast food so poor eating wasn’t the issue, I was just chubbier than everyone I was around.  When you’re surrounded by lean dancers but you still look like you only have cookies for all 3 meals, you start to feel some kinda way.  I continued to dance throughout college and on a huge campus like UNC, I walked everywhere. I didn’t consider any of this real exercise. I would occasionally show my face in the SRC but not enough to make a habit of it. I didn’t fully grasp  how eating, and sometimes in my case, not eating, played into my physique. I just knew that I wasn’t built like everyone else despite what I thought I was doing right. Fast forward to my first desk job out of school.

2007 – This was the first time I actually put on noticeable weight – to the tune of 30 lbs. I wasn’t dancing or walking around campus everyday. I occasionally did Turbo Jam in my living room but that would frequently end with me just sitting on my couch because I didn’t have the proper equipment. Imagine trying to do toning exercises with frozen chicken. Yeah, it was for the birds. I didn’t know how to actually lose weight in a healthy way. In a panic, I asked my closest friend, who was also a former personal trainer, what do to. We started working out together and doing Weight Watchers. This was my first taste of how having a support system, someone who was doing the same thing, and working with you, helped with results. I lost 20 lbs in 4 months. While I was pleased with my results, I still didn’t know how to do the work on my own. This became super clear when my friend and workout buddy moved and I lost my job. To say working out was the last thing on my mind was an understatement.

Who was I if I wasn’t working? How did I keep a healthy life without my buddy in toe? What was I to do when everyone else around me was off being awesome and I was in the middle of an SVU/resume-sending marathon? I didn’t know these answers but what I did know was that moon pies were delicious and made me feeling better about the job hunt. I justified my eating by saying if I walked to pick up the pizza it would be fine or that because it was Subway it was healthy. Eat fresh, right? The weight I worked so hard to lose and keep off came back and I hid from it. A wardrobe of over-sized cardigans and empire waist dresses filled my closet, as I continued to struggle during this phase of “lost me, gained pounds.”

Fast forward to 2009 – I started SYNC and I. Went. HAM! All the classes. All the bootcamps. Marveled at the instructors power and their commitment.  For the first time I started to like working out. I even woke up at the crack of dawn to get it in. I may have been late but at that stage of the game 45 mins was better than zero.  I grew to love this community. I drank the SYNC kool-aid and didn’t look back. I saw our instructors lead us on our journey every time we got on our mat or our bike but what I felt this nagging need to give back to those that pushed me to my limits. I wanted to guide those and show that we were/ are in it together. Every right knee up, every travel. So I became an instructor in January 2013. That’s when I decided to really start paying attention to what I was doing. How I was treating my body. How was I going to lead if I couldn’t follow my own plan?

I took a good hard look at my body and I saw this:

Processed with Moldiv

When did this even happen? 178? May 2013. I decided to make changes and not just a diet, a quick fix, but a change to my life. What I had been reading finally wanted to stick. This wasn’t a vanity project, it wasn’t because I needed to look like other dancers/friends/fitspo models. It wasn’t because I was shocked at my pant size (I wasn’t), this change was rooted in my future. Game on.

What made this time different? It wasn’t about anyone else. I was getting older and I knew I had to start taking care of myself for the long haul. So I took it one day at a time. Planned meals. Forgave myself for days that didn’t go as I wanted. Went to class and took rest days. Started being honest on MyFitnessPal and made realistic goals. I didn’t look at what I wanted my final to be but look at what I could do for the day/week/month. Celebrated my small victories and pushed myself to the next level.

The biggest lesson learned – be kind to yourself! Before last year, I only saw the failures in my pant size. Now I see the beauty in my journey. Most importantly though, it is a process full of baby steps and large leaps. Once I decided I wasn’t racing to a finish line, I knew I finally understood what the goals really were and how to reach them slowly but surely.

Processed with Moldiv

So here I am a year later and a month away from my 30th birthday, not just a SYNCCYCLING instructor but a personal trainer. If you would’ve asked me if I saw myself as a trainer 5 years ago, I would’ve laughed, showed you by pants size, and let that be my answer. I became a trainer because I saw an opportunity to give back to this awesome community. I became a trainer because it wasn’t my pants size that mattered but the heart that I put into each class.  I’m walking right there with you on this wellness ride! Shouting a “You’ve Got This!” for every sprint, push-up, and frowny face.

My journey started years ago but my renewed commitment started last year and continues to be strong. When you’re in class thinking that I woke up like this (#flawless), just remember I’m still in class beside you, singing at the top of my lungs and doing walkouts this time with jazz hands because it’s more fun that way.  We’ve all got this!

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Iman – My Journey to Fitness

Unlike a lot of kids, I didn’t play sports.  I wasn’t athletic.  I joined a couple of teams, but even though I was tall, I never dominated. Now, because I’m tall and have an athletic build, people stop me to ask if I played basketball or ran track.  If they saw me as a kid, though, they would not recognize me.

I’ve suffered from asthma my entire life and used that as an excuse for not being active. I couldn’t run from one side of a room to the other without needing my inhaler. For those of you who have never experienced an asthma attack, each time gasping for air is the worst feeling in the world. Running around outside or playing any kind of sport on a regular basis was out of the question. Instead,  I sat on my butt playing video games. Nintendo seemed to be a lot safer and more fun than getting winded. So not only was I not active but I loved food… all kinds. I remember coming home from school heating up leftovers as my after school snack- it could have been steak, spaghetti or whatever we had the night before – foods that were most likely tasty but not healthy. The video games and unhealthy eating eventually led to weight gain. I remember getting teased by kids at school for my size and for my health issues. It made me sad because I hated being different. I wanted to be “normal” and just blend in with everyone else.

By the time I was in middle school my health had gotten worse. The side effects from my constant inhaler usage were causing me to develop epileptic seizures. This caused my parents to take some action and look into alternative medicine. I started seeing a homeopathic doctor which, in the mid 90’s, was a really alternative solution. I feel blessed to have parents who were open-minded to seeking other options when it came to my health. After using homeopathy for about a year my seizures went away and I haven’t had one since the 8th grade. Soon, I didn’t need my inhaler and I still only need it occasionally.

At this point, I was beginning high school and the last thing I wanted to do was be an overweight teen. I wanted to be skinny and look like a typical attractive high school student which, in my mind, looked like a cast member of “Beverly Hills, 90210”. I decided I needed an action plan. I needed to educate myself because a healthy lifestyle wasn’t consistent in my home. My mom had VHS exercise tapes laying around that she had done sporadically over the years so I decided to start with those. Once I mastered one, I would go on to the next and soon,  I had mastered them all. I used my own money to buy exercise tapes and I did them all — Jane Fonda, Denise Austin, The Firm, Richard Simmons, Elle Macpherson, Cindy Crawford, Paula Abdul… the list is endless! The summer in between 8th and 9th grade I lost 10 pounds from working out alone. It was so nice seeing the difference not only on my mother’s scale, but in my clothes. This only motivated me to do more. I started buying fitness magazines and books, reading up on nutrition and portion control.

Since my parents didn’t cook, I started cooking my own healthy meals. I read about steaming vegetables [so THAT’S how we use that weird metal spaceship with holes in the back of one of the kitchen cabinets!].   More importantly I stopped eating junk. I went an entire year without eating fast food. This helped me lose even more weight. I lost 30 pounds by the end of my freshman year of high school.

Then came the dreaded plateau! My weight wouldn’t budge anymore. I would weigh myself multiple times a day and get annoyed when the number didn’t drop. I was still working out and eating healthy but I wasn’t losing any weight. I became desperate and frustrated. I did crazy things to try to make the scale budge. I ate minimal calories and slept a lot on weekends so I wouldn’t have many waking hours to eat. I got down to an all- time low of 130 pounds. I had no muscle definition and was just thin.  Thankfully, I realized quickly that I needed more calories to be healthy and continue to work out. I eventually went back to eating a healthy diet and stepped up my workouts even more. I convinced my mom to buy the newly released Tae-Bo videos and made that my daily exercise routine. I also added evening walks around the neighborhood after dinner.  I was happy with my progress but was getting bored with my home exercise routine. I was ready to try something different.

I decided to look into a local health club and after my first visit decided to sign up for a membership. I enjoyed the different options they had to offer: aerobics classes, cardio equipment, weights, and personal training. I loved it so much, in fact, I applied for a job and started working there. I remained employed there even when I went off to college. I would come back and work over the holidays and weekends when I was in town. It was there that I took my first Spinning class. I came back and took more and soon it became part of my regular fitness routine. After taking the classes for about two years I decided I wanted to try teaching them. I became a certified Johnny G Spinning instructor and for the next several years I taught at various health clubs in the area. I even became promoted from a front desk receptionist to a manager. After I graduated from NC State, I worked there full-time for a year before deciding to advance my career.

I decided to begin graduate school at NCCU in the Physical Education and Recreation department. I wasn’t sure what I wanted to do professionally but I knew I wanted to work in athletics or fitness. I also was offered the opportunity to work as a graduate assistant in the Department of Physical Education and Recreation and the athletics department at NCCU. After my third year with the program, I was finished with classes and it was time begin my master’s thesis. At this point, I was so burned out with school, working part time at the gym, teaching spinning classes, and being a graduate assistant, I felt like I needed a break. This ‘break’ led me to agree to train for and run a half marathon. The morning of the race I woke up thinking about how far I had come. I had been overweight, unhealthy and out of shape.  I had managed to lose weight and it changed my entire life. I was now running 13.1 miles for FUN. How about that! I remember around mile 10 my joints and everything in me began to hurt but I never stopped running. When I got close to the finish line I saw my friend Beth and as I crossed the finish line I wanted to collapse on the ground. I teared up at that moment- partly due to the cold weather and the pain in my legs, but mostly because I finished it. That was my most proudest moment yet.

Fast forward to late 2011, I had finally finished my master’s thesis and graduated! I was relieved to be done with my degree but I needed my next challenge. A friend of mine had been competing in figure competitions for the past couple of years and I always admired the sport. When I was first getting into fitness I got into reading Oxygen magazine and had a huge box full of them from over the years. I wanted to look like those women in the magazines and be strong like them. I never really thought that I could do it because it was ME. I put them in a separate category. How could I ever look like that? How could I ever compete like that? The fact that my friend Beth did it made it seem more real, though. She was a real person and I thought if she could do it—why not me?

In 2012, I took Beth’s advice and got in touch with her trainer, Leigh Ann Yeager, who I had known from my previous gym job. We had both worked at the same health club when I was a spinning instructor/ membership consultant. I remember being intimidated by her. She was a personal trainer and would walk around with her pigtails and bandana. I remember having only one conversation with her on the elliptical machine one day and it felt like I was speaking with the first lady. She scared me a bit so when Beth recommended that I contact her I was crying inside with fear. I didn’t want this chick to train me. I was afraid of her. I wanted to train with someone that I could have a good relationship with. I reminded myself that my 2012 New Year’s resolution was to get out of my own way. It was time to stop making excuses for not doing what I wanted and for not having the life I wanted anymore. I contacted Leigh Ann and we had our first meeting at Bean Traders. I had no idea what to expect. I remember ordering my latte and thinking “Should I get a latte or regular coffee? Would she judge me and think I wouldn’t be able to hang if I got a latte with sugar in it?” By the end of our meeting, I discovered she wasn’t as scary as I thought.

I began my training and diet preparations in late February of 2011. Leigh Ann e-mailed me my daily workouts and eating plan. It seemed so hard at first. For the first time, I had to weigh all of my food and carry it around with me everywhere I went. I learned quickly that it required planning ahead. My first workout was terrible. I completed it but the next day I was so sore it felt like I had been beaten. Simple tasks such as sitting on the toilet were extremely painful. Her response to me was it was to be expected and that I should soak in a hot bath. In my head I was thinking, “Really that’s it?” Yes, that was it.

As I progressed over the next several months I saw a transformation in my body that I never would have expected in a million years. I was amazed with the amount of muscle definition I had developed in only a few months. Here I was… training for a figure competition. Me- the overweight adolescent with asthma- was transforming into one of those women I had admired years ago in the Oxygen magazine. That’s what gave me the motivation everyday to push myself through those workouts. I was finally excited about fitness again. I had the spark and love about working out again. I wasn’t just going through the motions anymore. I had e-mailed Leigh Ann and told her that I was interested in becoming a personal trainer and if there would be room for me at SYNCSTUDIO. I thought maybe this is what I’m supposed to do. I had tried my hand at something else and I never felt that same passion as I did with fitness. Working in an office environment wasn’t for me. I had come back full circle and it felt like home.

I couldn’t wait to see what I would look like when I finally got on stage. That’s what made me stick to my diet and workouts everyday. There were several temptations around me. As much as I enjoyed the workouts, they left me sore and in a puddle of sweat. I had to kick my own butt because I was training alone. There were several days that I didn’t want to go to the gym after working 10, 11, sometimes 12 hours a day. There were times when I wanted to quit. About 4 weeks out from getting on stage for my first show I really wanted to quit. I was still so tired and sore. I was sick of eating tilapia and tuna. I wanted real food. I wanted cookies, cupcakes, just some real sugar. I wanted to feel normal but then I looked back at how far I had come. I wasn’t a quitter, so I pushed through. The week of the show, I hit a wall in the form of a cold. I was so worried. I felt miserable. I even missed work a couple of days but still went to the gym for my workouts with my throat lozenges and tissue in hand. Leigh Ann reassured me that I would be fine on the day of the show. Just make sure I drank all of the water each day that was in my plan for the week and it should help get it out of my system. Despite wanting orange juice and chicken soup,  I stuck to the plan and, as Leigh Ann said, by the day of the show I was ready for the stage.

After about 8 months of preparation it was the day of the Elite Muscle Classic. My nerves were all over the place. I had never been to a show before so I had no idea what to expect.  The night before, I got my very first spray tan. Yes, black girls get spray tans for figure competitions too. I had on my sparkling two piece suit that I had borrowed from a friend and I looked AMAZING, better than I could have ever imagined. As I stepped on stage I thought my heart was going to beat out of my chest. I was so nervous! I had been a shy person my entire life so getting on stage almost naked was a challenge. I wanted to prove to myself that I could do it.  There were six women in my height class and only five would become qualified for national competitions. As the MC announced the top five women, I heard my number on the loud speaker. I felt a little disoriented. I thought maybe it was a mistake. Did I really make the cut? They announced the 5th, 4th, 3rd, and 2nd place finishers.  At that point, I could hear my sister and my boyfriend in the audience cheering for me. It still hadn’t hit me that I had come in 1st place. I couldn’t believe it. My body was shaking and I couldn’t stop smiling. All I wanted to do was compete in a show. I did it to prove to myself that I could do it. I never expected to win! That was one of the greatest moments in my life. To finally win at something, especially at something that someone with my health background should never had been able to do.

A couple of weeks after the show, I came down off of my high. I contacted Leigh Ann again about becoming a personal trainer. I began studying for my personal training exam and on January 8, 2013 I officially became a trainer at SYNCSTUDIO– a decision that, every day, I’m so happy I made. I have come a long way but I remember what the struggle feels like. That’s why training others feels so natural to me. I can sincerely look into a client’s eyes and tell them I understand what they’re going through. I know how hard losing weight can be. Looking back through all of the health and weight issues I’ve had, I’m so glad that they all happened. It has allowed me to finally begin living the life that I’m supposed to live and doing what I love to do. This is only the beginning. The best is yet to come.


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[BOOTCAMP SERIES] #sexysummer

From Leigh Ann Yeager, Director of SYNCWELLNESS and Programming:

Every spring you tell yourself, after failed attempts at New Year’s Resolutions, that this year is THE ONE. This year will be the one where you buckle down, commit to working out, and achieve your goals. I know because I used to make the same promises to myself.

I found, after years of trying, that getting to my goals was easy as long as I had the right resources.

I needed a plan.  I needed support.  I needed accountability.  I needed to make time for myself.

I’m ready to give YOU those resources, SYNCSTUDIO [DURHAM]…


THE PLAN:  One hour-long, calorie-torching sweat session each week lead by the area’s best trainers and nutritional guidance and recipe idea to optimize results.

SUPPORT:  Connect with your trainers and your training partners on our SYNCWELLNESS Facebook page all day, every day.

ACCOUNTABILITY:  Check in on Facebook, myfitnesspal.com, and Instagram and receive weekly emails from your trainers.

TIME FOR YOURSELF:  Meet with your trainer and your workout partners on Saturday mornings at 8am sharp at SYNCSTUDIO [SOUTH DURHAM].

Are you in?


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Bi-Weekly JAMZ – Dec. 6

Jamz, y’all, jamz! A little bit more Bieber and a whole lot more WEIRD.

Jamz December 6

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